Current Research

LINKING SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO TO HEARING AID OUTCOMES
Despite advances in hearing aid technology, hearing aid users continue to have difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments.  Behavioral and biological research has demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is an important variable in perception.  The purpose of this research is to assess the role that SNR plays at various stages of the aided speech understanding process and in other hearing aid outcomes.  

SENSITIVITY TO SPECTROTEMPORAL MODULATIONS AS A PREDICTOR OF HEARING AID SUCCESS 
Recent research has shown that sensitivity to spectrotemporal modulations (STM) explains a large portion of the variability in speech understanding scores, even when accounting for audibility.  The goal of this line of research is to evaluate whether we can better predict who would be a successful candidate for hearing aids based on STM sensitivity.


COMMUNICATIVE PARTICIPATION ITEM BANK FOR LISTENERS WITH HEARING LOSS 
A questionnaire has been developed to measure communicative participation for individuals with speech and language disorders, called the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB).  The goal of this research is to evaluate whether the same questionnaire is relevant and applicable to listeners with hearing loss.  The results of this work would allow for direct comparisons of the consequences of various communication disorders on participation in life events.